2023 APCCMPD Annual Conference 

 

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

March 9, 2023
Portland, OR


Breakout Sessions are intended for a LIVE audience only


Rounds 1 & 2, Breakout 1: Gamification in PCCM Education
Rounds 1 & 2, Breakout 2: Bite-Sized Upstander Training: How to Launch High-Yield Training in Smaller Sessions
Rounds 1 & 2, Breakout 3: Promoting Interprofessional Teaching in the ICU
Rounds 3 & 4, Breakout 4: Making the Connection: How to Successfully Convey Your Program's Culture to Applicants in a Virtual Environment
Rounds 3 & 4, Breakout 5: The ACGME Self-Study: An Opportunity Not a Threat!
Rounds 3 & 4, Breakout 6: Advocacy Across the Spectrum: Harnessing Your Influence and Expertise to Promote Individual Health and Community Well-Being

 

Learn More and Register for the 2023 APCCMPD Annual Conference

  

Gamification in PCCM Education

Diana Kelm, MD
Darlene Nelson, MD, MHPE
Viren Kaul, MD
Jenn Duke, MD
Mayo Clinic Rochester

SESSION DESCRIPTION
“Gamification” is the application of the characteristics and benefits of games to real world processes or problems. Gamification in medical education has the ability to provide an active learning environment in which students can gain experience solving clinical problems without risk to patients. This novel approach can support learning by engaging students and providing motivation through the use of feedback/rewards and embedded reasoning skills. A systematic review on gamification in health profession education suggests that gamification is at least as effective as traditional classrooms and, in many studies, more effective for improving knowledge, skills, and satisfaction. In this session we will review current gamification theory and discuss implementation of available education game platforms like Jeopardy templates and Kahoots!, as well as innovative uses of escape rooms and simulation games.

SESSION OBJECTIVES
At the conclusion of this session participants should be better able to:
1. Review current literature of gamification theory and implementation.
2. Describe novel examples of gamification in medical education.
3. Discuss strategies to incorporate games into program curriculum and potential barriers that may arise.
 

Bite-Sized Upstander Training: How to Launch High-Yield  Training in Smaller Sessions

Cheryl Loudd
Tristan Huie, MD
Anna Neumeier, MD
Melissa New, MD
Trevor Steinbach, MD
University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Upstanding is a fundamental practice to allyship, a skill that must be practiced and developed amongst fellows and faculty. Barriers to this practice and training include perceived lack of expertise, and the perception that an Upstander Training must be a larger, multi-unit effort that takes several hours to be successful. The goal of this session is to demonstrate how Upstander Training can be effectively implemented on a smaller scale in forums such as Grand Rounds, educational sessions, or smaller gatherings using a Train-the-Trainer model. Participants who complete the workshop will have strategies and curricular scripts to help them formulate Upstander Response Training.

SESSION OBJECTIVES
At the conclusion of this session participants should be better able to:
1. Recognize racism, discrimination, and microaggressions that occur in the clinical setting.
2. Identify appropriate mitigation strategies in response to racism, discrimination, and microaggressions.
3. Apply curricular strategies to incorporate upstanding as one of many practices to promote an inclusive learning environment.

Promoting Interprofessional Teaching in the ICU

Asha Anandaiah, MD
Camille Petri, MD
Massachusetts General Hospital/Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Kristin M. Burkart, MD, MSc
Columbia University Medical Center

SESSION DESCRIPTION
This session will focus on strategies to promote interprofessional teaching in the intensive care unit. We will present a brief overview of the literature supporting the importance of interprofessional teams and discuss approaches to creating an environment conducive to collaborative teaching. Through video portrayals (created for APCCMPDScholars) of common teaching and learning scenarios that occur during ICU rounds , we will explore opportunities for teaching by various team members, such as nurses, respiratory therapists, and pharmacists. In addition, through interactive discussion, the group will identify specific strategies to address common challenges and avoid potential pitfalls related to interprofessional teaching. Finally, we will demonstrate how APCCMPD members can use these videos to teach faculty and fellows about this important topic.

SESSION OBJECTIVES
At the conclusion of this session participants should be better able to:
1. Attendees will develop strategies to create an educational environment that promotes interprofessional teaching in the ICU.
2. Attendees will practice formulating questions that create focused opportunities for teaching by interdisciplinary team members while maintaining rounds efficiency,
3. Attendees will learn how they can leverage videos available on APCCMPDScholars for faculty and/or fellow development about interprofessional teaching.

Making the Connection: How to Successfully Convey Your Program's Culture to Applicants in a Virtual Environment

Laura Hinkle, MD, ATSF
Indiana University School of Medicine
Keriann Van Nostrand, MD
University of South Florida Morsani

SESSION DESCRIPTION
It has become apparent that virtual interviews are here to stay. While they offer many benefits for both programs and applicants, a frequently cited disadvantage is the difficulty experienced by applicants in gauging the culture of a program and determining if it is a good fit for them. This session will outline techniques for giving applicants a sense of your program’s culture in the virtual environment and will include interactive discussion among attendees about identified barriers and strategies for success in this area.

SESSION OBJECTIVES
At the conclusion of this session participants should be better able to:
1. Develop strategies for conveying their program’s culture to applicants virtually during the interview day.
2. Identify barriers to successful conveyance of their program’s culture in the virtual setting and how to overcome them.
3. Evaluate potential avenues for conveying their program’s culture via social media to engage with applicants even before the interview day.

The ACGME Self-Study: An Opportunity Not a Threat!

Tristan Huie, MD
University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine
Matthew C. Miles, MD, MEd, FCCP
Wake Forest University School of Medicine
Ashley G. Henderson, MD
University of North Carolina
Başak Çoruh, MD
University of Washington

SESSION DESCRIPTION
The ACGME Self-Study is a new process intended to help programs improve by performing a comprehensive and longitudinal self-assessment. The requirement for Self-Study was delayed due to the pandemic but resumed in July 2022. In this workshop, programs who have performed a Self-Study will report on successes and challenges they faced and offer advice. Small group discussions will examine the process of developing program aims, developing tools for longitudinal assessment, and practical tips for successful implementation.

SESSION OBJECTIVES
At the conclusion of this session participants should be better able to:
1. Describe the requirements of the ACGME Self-Study process.
2. Examine useful practices and potential pitfalls in the Self-Study process.
3. Plan an initial approach to conducting their own successful Self-Study.

Advocacy Across the Spectrum: Harnessing Your Influence and Expertise to Promote Individual Health and Community Well-Being

May M. Lee, MD
University of Southern California
Benjamin Hoffman, MD, CPST-I
Joel Burnett, MD
Kelsi Manley, MD
Oregon Health & Science University
Kathleen Doo, MD, MHPE
Kaiser Permanente

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Strong advocacy efforts are necessary to improve persistent problems of unequal health outcomes and structural racism. The AMA calls for physicians to “advocate for social, economic, educational, and political changes that ameliorate suffering and contribute to human well-being.” Competency in advocacy is an ACGME requirement for internal medicine training. Health care practitioners are well-positioned to be agents of change whether we recognize it or not. Many of us are community leaders or hold positions of authority where the ethical compass that guides our patient care can be well-utilized. We can be transformational leaders by making small or large adjustments in our clinical spaces, clinician-educator roles, and broader communities. We hope that this session will propagate further interest, awareness, and political activity in combating structural racism and the societal drivers of health disparity on behalf of our patients, our profession, and our society.

SESSION OBJECTIVES
At the conclusion of this session participants should be better able to:
1. Define what advocacy means; introduce Carlisle’s theoretical model on health promotion, advocacy, and health disparities.
2 Illustrate examples of advocacy at different levels: Representation, Community Development, Community Activism and Social Policy Reform.
3. Discuss in small groups how to apply advocacy efforts to one’s practice or program with a focus on teaching advocacy to medical trainees.